ANGLICAN CHURCH OF ST PAUL

Overview

Heritage Category: Listed Building

Grade: II

List Entry Number: 1393387

Date first listed: 23-Jul-2009

Statutory Address: ANGLICAN CHURCH OF ST PAUL, 840, WALSALL ROAD

Map

Ordnance survey map of ANGLICAN CHURCH OF ST PAUL
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Location

Statutory Address: ANGLICAN CHURCH OF ST PAUL, 840, WALSALL ROAD

The building or site itself may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

District: Birmingham (Metropolitan Authority)

National Grid Reference: SP 04920 93781

Summary

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

The Anglican Church of St Paul, Hamstead, is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * A good example of a late C19 church by recognised architect William Davis * It contains several stained glass windows of particular quality by notable stained glass artists, including A. J. Davies of The Bromsgrove Guild * It has historic interest for its close relationship with the coal mining community of Hamstead

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details



997/0/10471 WALSALL ROAD 23-JUL-09 Hamstead 840 Anglican Church of St Paul

II Anglican Church of St Paul, 1892 by William Davis. Gothic style.

MATERIALS: Built of red brick with stone dressings. Plain tile roof.

PLAN: Nave, north and south aisle, shallow north and south transept, north and south porch, chancel with polygonal apse, organ chamber to the north, choir vestry and clergy vestry to south.

EXTERIOR: The east elevation has a polygonal apse with windows of two cusped lights with quatrefoil above. The south elevation has an added brick narthex to the west end and the transept and vestry to the west end. To the north elevation is four bay single storey brick extension with tall shaft, and to the east end of the elevation is the north transept and organ chamber with brick lean-to extension. The four clerestorey windows to the north and south elevation consist of three cusped lights with quatrefoil above with trefoils either side. To the steeply pitched roof is a louvred gablet.

INTERIOR: The four bay arcades are formed from round piers supporting pointed arches with impost and hood mould. Above the aisle arcade are the clerestorey windows. The arch-braced collar-rafter roof is supported on semi-circular stone corbels. To each transept are taller pointed arches supported on a half column to the west and a semi-circular stone corbel to the east. The moulded pointed chancel arch is supported on tall engaged round piers. The arch-braced collar-rafter roof is supported on semi-circular stone corbels. The chancel has an encaustic tiled floor and marble reredos, given as a memorial in 1902, with two niches housing figure sculptures. The chancel retains its complete set of furnishings including altar, choir stalls, chancel seating, handrails and altar rails. The organ is also contemporary and in its original location. The wooden pulpit with steps was a gift from St Mary's Church, Handsworth. The nave's original wooden chairs were replaced with pews in 1992. The pews to the west end of the nave have been removed and the octagonal stone font relocated to this space. To the east end of the south aisle is a wooden screen including the carved figures of St Chad and St Martin. To the north aisle are memorial screens. The north and south aisles retain notable stained glass windows. To the north aisle are two stained glass windows of 1932 by A. J. Davies of The Bromsgrove Guild. The windows are unusual for their subject of men and women at work. The window to the left includes a carpenter, blacksmith, farm labourer, coalminer and a chemist and the text: 'THERE IS NOTHING BETTER FOR A MAN THAN THAT HE SHOULD MAKE'. The window to the right depict men and women in various roles and includes a woman carrying eggs in a basket, a bishop, a painter, a nurse, a mother and child and a musician. The window has the text: 'HIS SOUL ENJOY GOOD IN HIS LABOUR FOR IT IS HIS PORTION'. To the right are two stained glass windows of 1928 designed by Walter Camm and executed by Florence, Robert and Walter Camm for the T. W. Camm, The Studio, Smethwick. Both windows depict elements of the story of the prophet Samuel. To the west of the south aisle is a further window by The Camm Studio. To the south aisle are two windows depicting farm labourers by George Cooper Abbs for J. Wippell & Co. and two windows by Swain Bourne & Son of Birmingham.

HISTORY: In 1865 a temporary church for Hamstead was erected: it was intended to last no longer than eleven years. In 1890 a site was given for the erection of a permanent church by the Birmingham architect, William Davies. The original estimate for the building of the church was £2,945 but the final cost was £6,570 18s 2d. The foundation stone was laid in July 1891 and the church was consecrated on the 28 September 1892. In 1894, St Paul's Church became a parish church. In 1969 the bell fleche became unsafe and was dismantled. St Paul's Church was closely linked with the Hamstead Colliery (1878-1965) and the miners and their families formed a significant part of the congregation. The church's links with Hamstead mining community are evinced by the miner's lamp and associated plaque to the north aisle and the gift of a coal cross.

SOURCES: N. Pevsner and A. Wedgwood, Warwickshire. The Buildings of England (2003) 181; R. Albutt, The Stained Glass Windows of A J Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild Worcestershire (2005) 18, 93; R. Thornton, Victorian Buildings of Birmingham (2006) 100; Q. Watt (ed.) The Bromsgrove Guild. An Illustrated History (1999) 109; http://www.stpaulshamstead.org.uk accessed 12-JAN-2009; http://www.churchplansonline.org.uk accessed 24-APR-2009

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION The Anglican Church of St Paul is listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * A good example of late-C19 church by recognised architect William Davis * It contains several stained glass windows of particular quality by notable stained glass artists, including A. J. Davies of The Bromsgrove Guild * It has historic interest for its close relationship with the coal mining community of Hamstead

Legacy

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System number: 506134

Legacy System: LBS

Sources

Books and journals
Albutt, R, The Stained Glass Windows of AJ Davies of the Bromsgrove Guild Worcestershire, (2005), 18, 93
Pevsner, N, Wedgwood, A, The Buildings of England: Warwickshire, (2003), 181
Thornton, R, Victorian Buildings of Birmingham, (2006), 100
'The Bromsgrove Guild' in An Illustrated History, (1999), 109

End of official listing