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Prehistoric Rock Art - Make your own Rock Art

This rock art from Doddington in Northumberland dates from the Late Stone Age or early Bronze Age and is a typical example of British rock art.

This rock art from Doddington in Northumberland dates from the Late Stone Age or early Bronze Age and is a typical example of British rock art.
This rock art from Doddington in Northumberland dates from the Late Stone Age or early Bronze Age and is a typical example of British rock art. © Historic England Archive. Ref:AA045828

Teaching idea

Explain to pupils that monuments like Stonehenge aren’t the only symbols left for us to use to try and understand what prehistoric people thought. Another really good source of evidence for archaeologists is ‘Rock Art’, as this can tell us about past cultures and their beliefs. In this session they will learn about Rock Art and have a go at making some of their own. Download the ready made PowerPoint with the accompanying notes and worksheets (above).

Start by getting pupils to make their 'rock' and leave it for 30 minutes to set whilst you follow the PowerPoint to look at Rock Art from around the world and play the quiz. Pupils will then have the knowledge to design and carve their own designs on to their 'rock'.

You could then use the links below to look at other prehistoric sites in Britain.

Learning aims and outcomes

  • Pupils will understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources
  • Pupils will learn about Bronze Age religion, technology and travel
  • Pupils will produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experience
  • Pupils will evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design

Prior knowledge

  • Pupils should know that Bronze Age people were just the same as people today in terms of intelligence and appearance

Extended learning and useful links

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