A sword pommel from the Staffordshire Hoard
This gold and garnet pommel (K1195) from the Staffordshire Hoard used lime mortar in its core. © Barbican Research Associates Ltd, Guy Evans
This gold and garnet pommel (K1195) from the Staffordshire Hoard used lime mortar in its core. © Barbican Research Associates Ltd, Guy Evans

Update on Staffordshire Hoard Research

The largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver ever found, the Staffordshire Hoard links us back to an age of warrior splendour in seventh century England. Found by a metal detectorist in 2009, the hoard consists of fragments of high-quality war gear, mainly swords.

After archaeologists were alerted to the finds, Historic England gave funds and advice to Staffordshire County Council to help retrieve and secure them.

A major public fund-raising effort purchased the hoard jointly for Birmingham City Council and Stoke-on-Trent City Council. Birmingham Museums Trust and the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent are jointly responsible for the care of it.

See a full list of partners and funders.

Visit the Staffordshire Hoard

Staffordshire Hoard conservation and research

Historic England, has given £400,000 to fund a research project that is helping to reveal the secrets of the Staffordshire Hoard and increase public understanding of this unique archaeological treasure. The owners of the hoard have also contributed towards this research.

Research online

With approximately 4,000 fragments to analyse, the research project has been running since 2012.

At the half-way point, the researchers Barbican Research Associates summarised findings in Historic England Research Magazine Issue 2.

A further 24 specialist reports and surveys are now available online via the Archaeology Data Service .

Find out more from the Staffordshire Hoard research project update.

A major new book on the Hoard

November 2019 will see the publication of a book 'The Staffordshire Hoard: an Anglo Saxon Treasure' exploring the Hoard in more depth, the objects’ meanings and how they relate to each other.

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