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Multi-period remains at Hentor Warren

List Entry Summary

This monument is scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 as amended as it appears to the Secretary of State to be of national importance. This entry is a copy, the original is held by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Name: Multi-period remains at Hentor Warren

List entry Number: 1019082

Location

The monument may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County: Devon

District: South Hams

District Type: District Authority

Parish: Shaugh Prior

National Park: DARTMOOR

Grade: Not applicable to this List entry.

Date first scheduled: 14-Mar-1962

Date of most recent amendment: 09-May-2001

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: RSM

UID: 24230

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Monument

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Dartmoor is the largest expanse of open moorland in southern Britain and, because of exceptional conditions of preservation, it is also one of the most complete examples of an upland relict landscape in the whole country. The great wealth and diversity of archaeological remains provides direct evidence for human exploitation of the Moor from the early prehistoric period onwards. The well-preserved and often visible relationship between settlement sites, land boundaries, trackways, ceremonial and funerary monuments as well as later industrial remains, gives significant insights into successive changes in the pattern of land use through time. The prehistoric and historic archaeological landscape at Hentor Warren represents a complex array of interrelated structures and features belonging to the three main periods of upland exploitation. The post-medieval field system is the most extensive, covering the entire monument, but also within the area is the well-preserved evidence for prehistoric settlements, land division boundaries and funerary monuments together with medieval farmsteads, fields, shelters and tinworks. In the post-medieval period as well as the extensive field system, a farmstead, warren, tinworks, peat cutting earthworks and finally military structures highlight the continued intensive use of this area.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

This monument includes extensive prehistoric and historic archaeological monuments situated within Hentor Warren, which lies between the Shavercombe and Hentor Brooks. The prehistoric archaeology includes three partially enclosed stone hut circle settlements, ten round cairns, one ring cairn, four cists, part of the Willings Walls Reave and a cairnfield. The medieval archaeology includes two farmsteads, an associated field system, transhumance huts and a small area of tin streamwork earthworks. The post-medieval archaeology includes pillow mounds, vermin traps and animal runs forming part of a rabbit warren, a farmstead, field system, shelters, several lengths of leat, military buildings, mortar emplacements and slit trenches, an area of peat cutting and at least one peat rick, prospecting pits and streamworks. Together these buildings and structures add a complex multi-period archaeological dimension to the landscape, which represents the three major periods of intensive activity on Dartmoor. The western partially enclosed stone hut circle settlement lies downslope and west of the Willings Walls Reave, extends over 7ha and includes five enclosures (two of which are attached to each other) and 21 stone hut circles. The stone hut circles survive as banks of stone and earth each surrounding a circular internal area. The internal diameter of the huts varies between 3m and 6.7m with the average being 4.81m. The height of the surrounding wall varies between 0.3m and 0.9m with the average being 0.6m. One of the huts has a hooked porch, fifteen have visible doorways, ten are linked by enclosure walling, one is attached to an enclosure wall, three lie within enclosures and seven are unenclosed. The northern partially enclosed stone hut circle settlement, extends over 16ha and includes at least 7 enclosures and 22 stone hut circles. The internal diameter of the huts varies between 2m and 7m with the average being 4.11m. The height of the surrounding walls varies between 0.2m and 0.8m with the average being 0.44m. The third settlement lies on the north west facing slopes immediately below Hen Tor. This settlement includes at least 3 enclosures and 23 stone hut circles. The internal diameters of the huts vary between 2m and 6.1m, with the average being 4.04m. The height of the surrounding wall varies between 0.3m and 0.9m with the average being 0.57m. At least ten round cairns survive within the monument. Eight of these lie on the lower north facing slope of Hen Tor and the remaining two are situated west of the Willings Walls Reave. The cairns on the northern slopes of Hen Tor form part of a wider distribution of funerary monuments and the others are the subject of separate schedulings. The round cairn at SX59096577 measures 2.9m in diameter and stands up to 0.15m high. A kerb of small upright granite slabs surround the mound which has been excavated to reveal a cist orientated SSE to NNW. The interior of the cist measures 0.5m long, 0.44m wide and 0.2m deep. A second cairn containing a cist lies 270m to the east at SX59366580 and this survives as a 5m diameter mound standing up to 0.4m high. Protruding from the mound are at least six upright stones forming a circle with a diameter of 2.4m. The interior of the area formed by this internal kerb has been excavated to reveal a cist orientated south east to north west. The interior of the cist measures 0.68m long, 0.4m wide and 0.5m deep. A flat, partly buried stone lying immediately south west of the cist may be the displaced capstone. Another cairn lies at SX59496581, 130m east of the second and this mound measures 7m long by 5m wide and stands up to 0.4m high. The remaining cairns on the northern slopes of Hen Tor form a round cairn cemetery centred on SX59306614 and lie amongst a cluster of stone hut circles. Three of the mounds are circular in shape and vary in diameter between 3.6m and 9.3m, with the average being 5.63m. The remaining cairns are oval in shape; one measures 6m long by 5.3m wide and the other is 6.7m long by 6.3m wide. The heights of all the mounds vary between 0.5m and 0.8m, with the average being 0.62m. Three of the mounds have hollows dug into their centres suggesting partial early excavation or robbing. The remaining two round cairns within the monument lie immediately west of the Willings Walls Reave on a terrace at SX58416558 overlooking the Hentor Brook. The western mound measures 4m in diameter and stands up to 0.6m high. The eastern mound lies 1m from the first and measures 4.6m in diameter and 0.8m high. The ring cairn stands at SX58376570 and survives as a 7m diameter circle of edge set stones standing up to 0.7m high. Within the area defined by the stones are three sub-rectangular hollows. The southern one measures 1.6m long, 1.3m wide and 0.4m deep, whilst the northern one is 1.1m long, 1m wide and 0.15m deep. The remaining hollow lies east of the others and measures 1m long by 0.9m wide and 0.15m deep. Two of these hollows probably represent the sites of the two cists mentioned by Breton who referred to this cairn as the `Ditsworthy Circle'. The cairnfield includes at least 14 mounds, lies on the northern slope of Hen Tor and is centred at SX59246586. Eleven of the cairns are circular in shape and these measure between 1m and 3.6m in diameter and stand between 0.1m and 0.5m high. The remaining three are oval and measure between 3m and 4m long by 2m and 3m wide and stand between 0.2m and 0.4m high. These cairns lie immediately next to a series of boundary banks and stone hut circles, and whilst no overall pattern is discernible, it is possible that these cairns were produced during initial clearance which did not have the opportunity to develop. One cairn lies in the centre of a circular enclosure which survives as a 56m diameter area defined by a 1.4m wide and 0.2m high rubble bank around the northern and southern sides and as a buried feature elsewhere. Part of the Willings Walls contour reave lies within this monument and its function seems to have been to separate the higher moorlands from the grazing lands on the lower slopes. Only a relatively short length of the reave lies within this monument and it can be traced from SX58446554 on the Hentor Brook to SX59396637 on the Shavercombe Brook with a branch leading to SX58606597. This branch may represent the original route taken by the reave before the decision was taken to reroute it along the slopes of Hentor Warren. The branch length of the reave survives as a slighter earthwork and whilst this may be because of peat accumulation it seems more likely to represent the original character of the reave. Unfortunately it is not possible to compare this length of reave with the other lengths surviving within the monument because elsewhere the reave has been refurbished during the medieval and post-medieval periods. The reave continued to form an important land division boundary in the historic period. The medieval and post-medieval fields within Hentor Warren all hang off the reave with some being attached to the lower side and some on the upper. Since the reave continued to form an important boundary within the field system it was necessarily refurbished. This involved adding more stone and earth and in places drystone walling was built. In later years when the warren was established at Hentor small parts of the reave were modified. At SX58486562 a vermin trap was built across it, whilst at SX58716586 a pillow mound was built upon it. During the medieval period two farmsteads together with associated field systems were established. The most northerly is situated within a partly refurbished prehistoric enclosure at SX59196635 and lies within the north eastern part of an extensive field system, which although reused in post-medieval times was probably laid out during the medieval period. The farmstead includes a long house, outbuildings, animal pen, garden plot and roadway sitting partly within an earlier refurbished circular enclosure. The long house survives as a rectangular two roomed building terraced into the hillslope. A roadway defined by rubble banks leads northward from the long house and immediately west of this is a triangular shaped garden measuring 15.5m long by 15m wide. To the south of the long house is a farmyard formed by the reused prehistoric enclosure. Built against the inner face of the south western wall of the farmyard are two structures. The interior of the western one is rectangular in shape and measures 5.5m long by 3.3m wide and is defined by a 2m wide and 0.3m high rubble bank. This structure probably represents an outbuilding. The second structure lies immediately east of the first, is sub- circular in shape and measures 15.5m long by 8m wide and is defined by a 1.7m wide and 0.4m high rubble bank. The second farmstead is Hentor Farm. The earliest reference to the settlement, in the form of Hyndetorr dates to 1375, though this is only the first appearance of the name and not necessarily the original medieval settlement. Its post-medieval use is well documented though there is no evidence of continuous occupation from the 14th century. It was still in use during the Napoleonic Wars and the result of this later activity is that most of the visible features are probably of post-medieval date. The historic field system at Hentor Warren covers approximately 101ha, is situated on the lower slopes of Hentor and overlooks the valleys of the River Plym, and Shavercombe and Hentor Brooks. The field system is attached to the earlier Willings Walls Reave which was refurbished at the time the fields were laid out. It is considered very likely that the group of rectangular fields forming the northern part of the system were laid out in their present form during the medieval period, although it is possible that some were built upon earlier prehistoric fields hanging off the Willings Walls Reave. It is known that these fields were still being used in the early part of the 19th century when Peter Nicholls cultivated fields known as Five Reaves, with help from a labourer and five pairs of oxen during the Napoleonic Wars. The traces of broad rig and furrow visible within some of these fields may date to this period of exploitation. The southern and eastern part of the field system is laid out informally and formed by at least six large irregular fields, each defined by a drystone wall, which in places is revetted by an earth and stone bank. Only one length of field boundary appears not to have been refurbished in the post-medieval period. This is a 410m length of 1m wide and 0.3m high bank leading from the Willings Walls Reave at SX58446554 to the Hentor Brook at SX58206574. The accompanying ditch lies on the northern side of the bank and measures 1m wide and up 0.5m deep. Along its western edge, the field system's drystone field wall overlies in part an earlier alluvial streamwork. This streamwork is considered to be of medieval date and therefore this length of walling must either be late medieval or, more likely, post-medieval in origin. At SX59166628 a number of barbed wire entanglement stanchions lie within an area where the field boundary has been truncated. It seems most likely that this short length of field wall was damaged during military training. The field system appears to have ceased functioning for arable purposes before the rabbit warren was established in this area. There are several examples of pillow mounds and animal runs lying within the fields, whilst in places, the earlier field walls have been converted into pillow mounds. The field system certainly seems to have been abandoned before 1835 when the Phillips Leat was cut through several of the fields. Most of the earlier medieval fields remained in use during the post-medieval period and some fresh ones may have been brought into use. The northern of the two farmsteads was abandoned and the focus for agricultural activity was Hentor Farm at SX59006560. The farmstead survives as a series of buildings and related structures most of which are considered to be post-medieval in date. The farmstead is delimited on the north by the farmhouse and other buildings, on the west and south by a 1m wide and 0.4m high stone wall, and on the east by the Phillips Leat which probably overlies an earlier leat. It is known that the water supply to the farm was carried in a leat from Shavercombe Brook and although this leat no longer survives it is very likely that the later Phillips leat which passes immediately upslope of the farmstead follows the same course. Several buildings and other related structures form the Hentor farmstead and amongst these are the farmhouse, farmyard, outbuildings, yards, dog kennel and a possible mill. Alluvial streamworks are situated within the valley bottoms of the River Plym, and Hentor and Shavercombe Brooks. The waste dumps, water channels, work areas or tyes associated with this extractive operation survive over a large area. A very small part of the streamworks lie within the monument. The streamworks include parts of spoil dumps represented by linear banks and hollows which indicate the position of partially backfilled tyes. The spoil dumps were formed by waste material being thrown systematically downstream into previously worked areas. The alignment and shape of the surviving mounds indicates that exploitation was carried out using only shovels to dispose of the waste gravel and stones. Often associated with streamworks are prospecting pits. A group of six prospecting pits situated at SX58156598 were presumably excavated to examine the area for alluvial tin deposits. The largest of these pits measures 3.5m long, 2.3m wide and 0.5m deep. The associated crescent shaped bank lies downslope and measures 3m wide and stands up 0.9m high. Several named tinworks are recorded within the monument and amongst these are: `Hentormeade/Hyndtormeade' recorded in 1527 and 1625, `Wenfford', `Greinewill', `Heigher Wenvurr' and `Woulterbrooke/Wolterbrooke' recorded in 1625, `Willings/Great Wyllynges Set/Great Willparke of Morwell Willinges' recorded in 1583, 1599 and 1625, and `Yeasterhill' recorded in 1625 and 1639. Within the monument are three small rectangular buildings which have been identified as historic shelters. One of these lies immediately adjacent to tinwork earthworks and is therefore probably a tinners' buildings. The interior of the triangular tinners' building at SX58106597 measures 2.4m long by 2.4m wide. The field wall to which it is attached measures 1m high and the remaining two walls are 0.6m and 0.3m high. Two of these shelters may have been transhumance huts or structures associated with warrening. The interior of the rectangular building at SX59226623 measures 6m long by 2.5m wide and is defined by a 1.3m wide and 0.4m high rubble wall. A spread of rubble leading between the long axis of the structure may represent a partition or tumble. The second structure is situated within a prehistoric enclosure at SX58246584, its interior measures 6.6m long by 3.5m wide and is defined by a 1.2m wide and 0.7m high coursed drystone wall. The doorway leads through the lower long wall; it is 1m wide and faces SSW. Rabbit farming was an important activity within this monument during the post- medieval period and a large proportion of Hentor Warren lies within this monument. Hentor Warren, which covers an area of approximately 180ha, was established by at least 1807, when a lease was granted by Lord Boringdon to Peter Nicholls of Sheepstor, a warrener. The warren is denoted by the River Plym along its north western side and by a series of five boundary stones (of which only three survive), leading from Spanish Lake Head via Shavercombe Head to Colesmills. Hentor Farm is considered to have been used as the warren house. Sometime shortly after 1815 the warren was taken over by and worked from nearby Ditsworthy and continued in use until the 1930s. At least 35 pillow mounds survive within the monument and most of these survive as flat-topped, sub-rectangular shaped mounds of soil and stone surrounded by the ditch from which material was quarried during their construction. The mounds vary in length between 8m and 51m, with the average being 22.23m. Their widths vary between 3.4m and 11m, with the average being 6.06m. The height of the mounds varies between 0.5m and 1.5m, with the average being 0.88m. Thirty three of the mounds are surrounded by a ditch and these vary in depth between 0.1m and 0.7m, with the average being 0.32m. Most of the pillow mounds lie in two discrete clusters. The first of these lies close to the Hentor Brook and the second is a group lying along the southern and north western edges of the regular field system. At least 11 pillow mounds were constructed on top of earlier and presumably disused field boundaries forming part of the regular field system, whilst another two were built within the fields themselves. Scattered throughout the part of the warren lying within the monument are at least eight vermin traps. Vermin approaching their quarry tend to seek a route that provides visual cover and the purpose of a trap was to funnel predators along ditches or beside walls to a central point where they could be trapped. Six of these traps were constructed against or across earlier field boundaries and were clearly intended to entrap the vermin following these artificial barriers. The traps survive as `X'-, `V'- or `Y'-shaped lengths of walling leading to a trapping area in which a stone box was originally placed. Within the warren at least 15 gullies, some of which are closely associated with pillow mounds are visible. These gullies generally survive as shallow, relatively steep sided hollows with a width of less than 1m and are associated with a low bank which represents the material upcast during their construction. In the past these gullies have been seen as drainage ditches. However the location, shape and alignment of many indicates that they could not all have had a drainage function. Their close association with vermin traps in several instances suggests that they are much more likely to represent animal runs, acting to control the movement of vermin. Peat cutting was a common historic activity on the uplands of Dartmoor. At SX59496597 a mound measuring 4m in diameter, stands up to 0.4m high and lies within an area of peat cutting earthworks. When cut, the peat turves contain a large volume of water, much of which was removed by drying the material in stages. First the turves were placed in pairs leaning against each other. Next they were placed into small piles called stooks and finally into larger heaps called ricks. In particularly wet years the peat within the ricks would not dry sufficiently and would be wasted. This mound is an example of a rick which did not dry and was left behind at the end of the season's work. A number of leats lie within the monument, and foremost amongst these is the Phillips Leat which was constructed by William Phillips in approximately 1835 to carry water to his newly leased clay works on Lee Moor. The leat took water from the River Plym, above Langcombe Brook, under Little Gnats Head, and during its working life was known as the Little Gnats Head Leat. Shortly after its construction an agreement was made that after use in the china clay works, the water was carried to serve Hemerdon tin mine. In 1877 the Bottle Hill Mine closed and the Lee Moor China Clay Works were able to use the former mine leat, which to this day remains operational and is known as the Lee Moor China Clay Leat. The Phillips Leat was therefore abandoned sometime around 1877. Within the monument the leat survives as a 1525m long, 1m wide and 0.5m deep channel flanked on the downslope side by a 2m wide and 0.4m high bank which was thrown up during its construction. At SX59056568 a bridge has been built over the leat and this survives as an arrangement of long flat stones. On its route through Hentor Warren the leat cuts through a number of earlier archaeological features, and amongst these are an enclosure, field system and animal runs. Some archaeological structures post-date the leat and amongst these are a military trench and mortar emplacements. A second leat lies on a gentle north facing terrace overlooking the River Plym. The leat leads from the lower side of the Lee Moor China Clay Leat at SX58356601 and survives as an earthwork lying approximately parallel to the clay leat until they merge again at Spanish Lake. It is considered to represent an earlier course of the Lee Moor China Clay Leat, and may have also been used by tinners. The leat channel measures 2m wide and 0.4m deep, whilst the bank upcast downslope during its construction survives as a 3m wide and 0.8m high earthwork. Within the area defined by this scheduling the leat has been slighted by the track between Ditsworthy and Hentor Farm and a pillow mound. Immediately upslope of another pillow mound the leat and bank have been removed, presumably an activity related to warrening. In the 20th century, a fresh use for this area was found when military training was carried out in the area around Shavercombe Tor. The features relating to this activity include circular structures which probably represent mortar emplacements, trenches and barbed wire entanglement stanchions. A total of four mortar emplacements survive immediately west of Shavercombe Tor. Three of these survive as banks of earth and stone surrounding a flat-bottomed circular hollow measuring between 4.8m and 6.6m in diameter and 0.5m deep. The fourth emplacement survives as a 5m diameter and 0.5m deep flat-bottomed circular hollow. All of these structures have previously been described as stone hut circles. A military interpretation is supported by the presence of large numbers of barbed wire entanglement stanchions scattered over the hillside. These would have been used to support barbed wire entanglements for training purposes and are included in the scheduling. A linear gully measuring 240m long, 1m wide and 0.3m deep, runs NNW and east from Shavercombe Tor. This has been interpreted as an elongated slit trench dug during military training in the first part of the 20th century. The Lee Moor China Clay Leat, the water tank lying adjacent to the Willings Walls Reave and pieces of corrugated iron sheeting are excluded from the scheduling, although the ground beneath these features is included. The monument is in the care of the Secretary of State.

MAP EXTRACT The site of the monument is shown on the attached map extract. It includes a 2 metre boundary around the archaeological features, considered to be essential for the monument's support and preservation.

Selected Sources

Books and journals
Breton, H H, Beautiful Dartmoor and its interesting antiquities, (1991), 49
Brewer, D, A field guide to the boundary markers on and around Dartmoor, (1986), 52-4
Brewer, D, A field guide to the boundary markers on and around Dartmoor, (1986), 52-4
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994)
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 128
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 123-4
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 118-21
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 123-4
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 123-4
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 93
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994)
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 124
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 121
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 157
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 147
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 118-21
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 122
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 122-3
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 121-22
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 123-4
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994), 118-21
Butler, J, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities, (1994)
Fleming, A, The Dartmoor Reaves, (1988), 44
Heal, S V E, Unenclosed stone hut circle settlement west of Shavercombe Tor, (1991)
Heal, S V E, Unenclosed stone hut circle settlement west of Shavercombe Tor, (1991)
Worth, R H, Worth's Dartmoor, (1981), 135-5
Fleming, A, 'Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society' in The Prehistoric Landscape Of Dartmoor Part 1: South Dartmoor, , Vol. 44, (1978), 117
Gerrard, S, 'The Dartmoor Newsletter' in Military Mortar Emplacements On Dartmoor?, , Vol. 11, (1993), 10
Grinsell, L V, 'Devon Archaeological Society Proceedings' in Dartmoor Barrows, , Vol. 36, (1978), 163
Grinsell, L V, 'Devon Archaeological Society Proceedings' in Dartmoor Barrows, , Vol. 36, (1978), 163
Grinsell, L V, 'Devon Archaeological Society Proceedings' in Dartmoor Barrows, , Vol. 36, (1978), 165
Price, D G, 'Devonshire Association Transactions' in The Moorland Plym - Abandoned Settlement Features Of Etc., , Vol. 112, (1980), 86
Turner, J R, 'Devon Archaeological Society Proceedings' in Ring Cairns, Stone Circles and Related Monuments on Dartmoor, (1990), 76
Turner, J R, 'Devon Archaeological Society Proceedings' in Ring Cairns, Stone Circles and Related Monuments on Dartmoor, (1990), 76
Other
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE112, (1982)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE126, (1985)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE146, (1992)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE147, (1992)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE156, (1992)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE159, (1992)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE229, (1986)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE236, (1985)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE249, (1972)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE274, (1972)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE483, (1993)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE528, (1992)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE56, (1992)
Devon County Sites and Monuments Register, SX56NE58, (1992)
Gerrard, G.A.M., The Early Cornish Tin Industry: An Arch. & Historical Survey, 1986, Unpubl. PhD thesis, St David's, Wales
Gerrard, G.A.M., The Early Cornish Tin Industry: An Arch. & Historical Survey, 1986, Unpubl. PhD thesis, St David's, Wales
Gerrard, G.A.M., The Early Cornish Tin Industry: An Arch. & Historical Survey, 1986, Unpubl. PhD thesis, St David's, Wales
Gerrard, S., English Heritage Book of Dartmoor, 1997, Forthcoming
Gibson, A, Single Monument Class Description - Stone Hut Circles, (1987)
Haynes, R.G., Ruined Sites on Dartmoor - Middleworth, 1966, Unpublished Manuscript
MPP fieldwork by S. Gerrard, (1995)
National Archaeological Record, SX56NE98,
Plate 16, Greeves, T A P, The Archaeology of Dartmoor from the Air, (1985)
PWDRO/72/1034, (1625)
PWDRO/72/990, (1639)
PWDRO/72/990/15, (1527)
PWDRO/72/990/51,31, (1583)
SM 10685, Heal, SVE, Unenclosed stone hut circle settlement west of Shavercombe Foot, (1991)
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Thackray, C., The Upper Plym Valley: The management of an historic landscape, 1994, Archaeological Site Inventory
Title: Sheet SX 56 NE Source Date: 1982 Author: Publisher: Surveyor:
Title: Sheet SX 56 NE Source Date: 1982 Author: Publisher: Surveyor: SX 59206620 and SX 59186618
Title: Sheet SX 56 NE Source Date: 1982 Author: Publisher: Surveyor: SX 59276619
Title: Sheet SX 56 NE Source Date: 1982 Author: Publisher: Surveyor: SX 59336619
Title: SX 56 NE 56 Source Date: 1982 Author: Publisher: Surveyor: SX 59106545

National Grid Reference: SX 58797 65784

Map

Map
© Crown Copyright and database right 2017. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2017. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
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End of official listing