A man preparing anti-measles serum, Guy's Hospital Medical School, Newcomen Street, Southwark, Greater London

A man preparing anti-measles serum, Guy's Hospital Medical School, Newcomen Street, Southwark, Greater London
Photograph taken 20 June 1938 © Source: Historic England Archive ref: med01_01_0013

A man preparing anti-measles serum at the Pathological Block of Guy's Hospital Medical School. A part of the bacteriological department’s work is the preparation of anti-measles serum, which is made from the blood of patients who have recently recovered from measles. The serum is used to give temporary immunisation to child patients. The use of anti-measles serum is an example of artificially acquired passive immunity. Compulsory vaccination for measles began in the UK in 1968, but it was not until a combined vaccination was introduced in 1988 that coverage was sufficient to substantially interrupt the spread of the disease.

Location

Greater London Southwark

Period

1930s (1930 - 1938)

Tags

medicine health people men